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Welcome to Georgian College Orientation is Tuesday, Sept. 8. Classes commence on Wednesday, Sept. 9. Check your campus tab for details.

Top reasons to attend orientation

  1. Connect with other new students. Whether you’re a mature student, directly out of high school, transferring, commuting, coming from another country, or whatever your situation, this is your chance to connect.
  2. Find out who’s who. Get to know the faces of Georgian College, hear from our President, academic deans, co-ordinators and more!
  3. Meet faculty. Find out what your classes will be like, get to know your teachers and classmates, ask questions about textbooks, papers or missed classes.
  4. Success. People who attend orientation feel more connected and comfortable on campus, and get a better start. At orientation, we’ll guide you to resources that will help contribute to your overall success.
  5. Get involved. Student clubs, on-campus jobs, volunteer work – find out how you can get involved at Georgian.
  6. Services. Find out how to get help with study skills, tutoring, counselling, learn about our athletic facilities and programs – you’ll find everything you need to know about the services available to you at Georgian.
  7. Free stuff. Who doesn’t like FREE stuff?

Are you an international student?

We look forward to welcoming you to Georgian College and invite you to join our college-wide orientation events. Please take a look at these pages for event details. In addition, the International Centre offers a mandatory pre-orientation event to help make your transition as easy as possible. Find out more about pre-orientation for international students.

Why come to Get Connected and orientation?

Welcome message from your college President

Mature Student Drive In Conference

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Hosted by Georgian College – Barrie Campus

The purpose of this conference is to obtain a greater knowledge of the unique challenges that mature students face in accessing, attending and persisting through postsecondary education in Ontario, and how within our various roles we can assist their transition, success and mental health.

Conference schedule

9 a.m. – 10 a.m. : Keynote Address, Alumni Hall

10 a.m. – 11 a.m. : Session #1, K Building

11 a.m. – noon: Session #2, K Building

noon – 1 p.m.: Lunch, The Last Class (TLC)

1 p.m. – 2 p.m.: Session #3, K Building

2 p.m. – 3 p.m.: Session #4, K Building

3 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.: Wrap Up, K Building

Keynote address: Tapping the Resiliency of the Mature Student

Presented by: Karyn Baker, MSW,RSW

Many mature students attending postsecondary find the experience a delicate balancing act between academic and personal responsibilities. This talk will highlight the toll that this can take on the student’s wellbeing. Also discussed will be tools and tips for how we can identify the strengths of these students, tap into their resiliency and instill hope in their success.

Session options

Practical Learning Strategies for the Mature Student

Presenters: Cindy Korpatnicki and Christina Meredith

In this interactive workshop, participants will identify both the characteristics of mature learners and the challenges they face.  Participants will also learn how to use mature student development theory to develop learning strategies to mitigate these challenges and help mature students become successful learners.

Mature Student First Year Experience

Presenter: Brian Poser

This session is aimed at easing the transition of mature students to university study. Topics include stress and relaxation, reading and note-taking, preparing for exams, academic literacies, and academic pathway planning. We have a couple of years of data on the program so far (evaluation data, that is; we’re hoping to collect grades/performance data), and all indications are that the program has a powerful impact on students’ early experiences at York.

It’s Different Here: The Experience of Rural Adult Learners

Presenter: Cynthia Gordon

Rural residents have different characteristics and learning needs than urban students. A review of literature highlights the challenges and opportunities to support rural students and takes a critical look at the benefits and drawbacks of web-based distance education as a solution to meet the education needs of rural mature students.

Mature Student Panel

Presenter: Brandy Mullen

Often during conferences, some of the most inspiring interactions and conversations take place during lunch, breaks and receptions. In this workshop you will be given the opportunity to meet and speak with several past and present mature students.

The panel will start with mature students doing a 60-second elevator speech that describes who they are, why they returned to school and what they were doing before college/university. After this it will be opened up to questions that may be general questions for anyone to answer or directed to a specific panelist.

The workshop will finish with a “chocolate and chat.” Attendees will be able to connect with mature students in small groups or a 1-1 capacity to informally chat while enjoying a lovely chocolate treat.

What’s Next?  Your Guide to Career/Life Planning in Ontario 

Presenter: Loretta Neebar

The What’s Next?  Your Guide to Career/Life Planning in Ontario is a collaboration between the Ontario School Counsellors’ Association (OSCA) and the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO).  It is available for no charge at www.whatsnextguide.ca . The guide was inspired by the Student Transition Eduation Program: University Preparation for Parents (STEPUPP) – www.stepupp.ca – an outreach program that was designed by the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) to educate first generation families about the post-secondary pathways in Ontario.   This What’s Next? guide is built upon the Ministry of Education’s four Education and Career/Life Planning inquiry questions in order to engage parents/guardians in a meaningful conversation with their child about their future, and the options available to them. The four questions are: Who am I?  What are my opportunities?  Who do I want to become? What is my plan for achieving my goals?  The questions and resources outlined in this guide are also relevant to mature students as they explore post-secondary pathways in Ontario.  Some questions will help them reflect on past educational or academic experiences and others will help them assess their current needs.  Throughout the guide are links that provide up-to-date and relevant information about all aspects of career and life planning.  As the guide is laid out in a workbook format, students and advisors can use it as a starting off point for discussion, research and exploration.

The Adult Learner’s Journey Through Education and Employment

Presenter: Susan McCabe and Maureen Arbour

Discussing the challenges of the adult learner in the community at large in accessing postsecondary education and employment. The focus will be on discussing the barriers and challenges, career decision-making, Second Career and supporting job search strategies.

Life is What Happens to You While You’re Busy Making Other Plans

Presenter: Greg Taylor

In this workshop, I will a share some ideas and some tools that I have found to be very helpful for mature students. This would include a “Transition Model” covered by William Bridges in his book, “Transitions: Making Sense of Life’s Changes,” and Steve Covey’s Time Management Grid. I have used these tools extensively in my counselling practice, in workshops and brief orientations for upgrading students.

Aboriginal Student and Mature Student Supports on campus

Presenter: Kathy Marsden and Michele O’Brien

In this workshop we will focus on best practices for supporting students of Aboriginal ancestry within Georgian College. Social, emotional, academic and spiritual supports are available to students, many who are also mature students and first generation students. We will share barriers that Aboriginal mature students encounter on their journey from accessing and attending Georgian, to persisting and transitioning out of Georgian College.  Included in this discussion will be statistics on Aboriginal postsecondary students within Ontario and specifically in Georgian College.

REGISTER HERE

Need overnight accommodation?  Please call 705-722-5190

Questions?

Contact Becca Allan at becca.allan@georgiancollege.ca

Register here

Presenter biographies

Karyn Baker is the Project Lead for the Campus Mental Health Partnerships project at Georgian College. This Mental Health Innovation funded project, in partnership with Centennial College, is developing a system delivery model of triage, care and partnership which can be disseminated to other postsecondary institutions. Karyn has worked in community mental health for 30 years and is presently on leave from her role as executive director of the Family Outreach and Response Program in Toronto. Karyn also works as a consultant and trainer in the area of mental health recovery.

Cindy Korpatnicki has been a full-time faculty learning strategist at Georgian College since 2011. She holds an MA in English literature. Cindy was a mature student when she started her undergraduate degree at the age of 44 and identifies with the challenges and benefits of being a mature student. Cindy is currently taking a break on her doctoral work in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies at York University where she is specializing in the long-term emotional consequences of intimate partner violence against women.

Christina Meredith has been a full-time faculty member at Georgian College since 2002. She is currently on a secondment filling in for a parental leave as the manager of library operations and Academic Success Centre. Christina holds an MA in sociology and a MSW in critical social work practice. Having recently completed her second graduate degree, online, through the University of Victoria while attempting to balance the care of three small children, Christina approaches her work on mature student development from both professional practice and lived experience.

Brian Poser joined the Atkinson Centre for Mature and Part-time Students as associate director in August 2008.  He completed a Bachelor of Arts degree at York University and holds a Master of Education degree from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto. Brian’s academic interests include computer-mediated learning environments, distance education, student self-regulated learning, adult development, and retention. From 1990 to 2004, Brian served as learning skills counsellor with the Counselling and Development Centre at York University. During that time, he also was an instructor in LLS1800 (Language and Learning Seminar for Students with Learning Disabilities) and co-authored the Fundamentals of Learning program, a structured retention program for at-risk students. In 2005, Brian joined the Student Community & Leadership Development team as manager, student activities and organizations, working in the areas of orientation and co-curricular student experience. In 2006, Brian assumed the role of manager, Student Success & Retention, with a mandate to integrate orientation and transition programming with ongoing student success support and pan-university retention initiatives. Brian has worked extensively with students on academic skills, time management, academic writing, learning styles, and personal success.

Lorretta Neebar is the associate registrar of student recruitment and admissions at the University of Toronto Mississauga with over 15 years of strategic enrolment management experience.  Lorretta was the project advisor on the What’s Next: Your Guide to Education and Career/Life Planning In Ontario (www.whatsnextguide.ca) produced by the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO) and the Ontario School Counsellors’ Association (OSCA). Lorretta is passionate about higher education and is dedicated to helping students and their families find their own postsecondary pathways.

Cynthia Gordon is a student in the MA-IS program at Athabasca University with a focus on work, organization and leadership. Her research has focused on workplace and labour issues, as well as adult education. She also has an honours Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology from the University of Guelph as well as a diploma in Human Resources Management. She has worked in the not-for-profit as well as the public sector, working most recently as a placement officer at Georgian’s Barrie Campus.   Cynthia is also involved in student governance and will be the 2015-2016 president of the Athabasca University Graduate Student Association. Outside of school and work, Cynthia spends as much time as possible outdoors with her husband and 7-year-old son camping, hiking and geocaching. Summers are spent playing and watching baseball.

Kathy Marsden, is the Getsijig (native education counsellor) at the Barrie Campus, Georgian College and has been in this role for 19 years. She provides personal and academic counselling to students of Aboriginal ancestry across all programs at the Barrie Campus, and works with NiwiJiagan peer mentors in the Aboriginal Resource Centre. Her background and experience includes addiction counselling and teaching at the primary and secondary levels.

Michele O’Brien has been teaching at Georgian since 2001 and became a co-op consultant and program co-ordinator in 2007. She values having close relationships with the students and effective communication at all levels. Consistently evaluating what “best practices” work, making change to meet the needs of the students and support systems, is what contributes to retention and the success of a graduating student. Michele also believes in following the Seven Grandfather Teachings and is committed to student success first.

Susan McCabe is currently working as an employment consultant with Georgian College’s Centre for Career and Employment Services and has been in employment services for over 25 years. She is presently assisting the public and community with their employment needs and providing guidance and support in all aspects of job search strategies. She was a pioneer in developing and implementing the employment services program currently being used by the County of Simcoe Ontario Works program and this model is currently being used by the province of Ontario. She has extensive experience assisting marginalized individuals including those with physical, emotional, mental health and developmental issues. Susan has a BA in sociology and psychology, with additional education in counselling, addictions, crisis intervention and employment. She has been working under the Employment Ontario guidelines since its inception and along with employment consulting, currently assists individuals with accessing skills training, job placement, job development and apprenticeship.

Greg Taylor currently serves as the Counselling Coordinator and Mental Health Case Manager at Georgian and has worked at Georgian for nearly 20 years. Before becoming a counsellor here, he worked in youth employment, corrections, residence management, co-op education, and currently holds a part-time private practice as a relationship therapist and couples workshop facilitator. Greg provides a number of workshops and trainings for both students and staff at Georgian, including topics such as suicide alertness training, compassion fatigue, stress management, conflict resolution and a workshop for mature students.

Maureen Arbour is an Employment Services Consultant with Georgian College’s Centre for Career and Employment Services. Maureen provides support and assistance to clients in our community with job search, job preparation and job development. She also assists clients to access training and self-employment programs. She has completed a Bachelor of Arts, Human Resources Management Diploma and the Teaching and Training Adults Certification and brings experience in employment services, human resources and sales.

Brandy Mullen is the Coordinator of the Academic Success Centre and the Math and Science Learning Strategist at Georgian College. She has been a full time faculty member since 2010. She has worked closely with First Year Experience and Student Success to develop a mature student orientation, an online forum for mature students, and has developed and delivered workshops specifically for this population. She completed her masters as a mature student at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland.

Get Connected: pre-orientation

Welcome

Get Connected is your chance to visit Georgian and connect with us before the September rush. We’ll help you with your transition to college life! Here are some of the things you can do to get connected:

  • Purchase your parking pass
  • Get a personalized tour of your classrooms
  • Learn about Banner and Blackboard
  • Purchase your fitness centre membership
  • Visit the Registrar’s Office for help with fees, OSAP, add/drop, get assistance with new queuing system, Qnomy.
  • Get your student card (bring photo ID)
  • Opt-out/find out more about student insurance
  • Attend a learning strategies session, and more!

Learn about Get Connected (pre-orientation) events by clicking on your campus’ tabs.

Get Connected: Pre-orientation

Your Get Connected events will happen the week of Aug. 17 to 21, and on Wednesday, Sept. 2.

Click here to register: http://fluidsurveys.com/s/fastpassgeorgian/

Get Connected is your chance to visit Georgian and connect with us before the January rush. We’ll help you with your transition to college life! Here are some of the things you can do to get connected:

  • Purchase your parking pass
  • Get a personalized tour of your classrooms
  • Learn about Banner and Blackboard
  • Purchase your fitness centre membership
  • Visit the Registrar’s Office for help with fees, OSAP, add/drop, get assistance with new queuing system, Qnomy.
  • Get your student card (bring photo ID)
  • Opt-out/find out more about student insurance
  • Attend a learning strategies session, and more!

Each session will start in Alumni Hall (Room K229)

Register here: http://fluidsurveys.com/s/fastpassgeorgian/

Get Connected Alumni Hall pic

Fall Orientation

Tuesday, Sept. 8                               

Your orientation day will include:

  • Welcome session with free swag and giveaways
  • Academic breakout session
  • Frosh carnival
  • Free pizza lunch
  • Outdoor fun festival
  • Tug of War challenge
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Ask Me: Stay Connected

First Two weeks of Classes

We can help you Stay Connected and provide ongoing transition support with our Ask Me booth. Find us  across from the Subway restaurant during the first weeks of school.

Late Connection

Did you miss Orientation day? Still need some help transitioning? Connect with us at Late Connection Orientation.

Family Orientation

As part of our Open House, the Georgian Orientation and Transition team hosts a Family Orientation Room. We want to make sure that your support team (family) is as connected to the college as you are! Encourage your family to drop by for a coffee, tea and something to eat, and to find out what they need to know about you coming to Georgian. We will have family information available about financial aid, library and academic supports, orientation and transition activities, first year experience and First Generation support, privacy and much more.

Orientation schedule from January 2015

10 a.m. to noon.

Programs: Personal Support Worker and Office Administration

  • Welcome reception in Room 113 with coffee, pastries and welcome bags
  • Campus welcome
  • Info session – campus and general info – including distribution of program outlines
  • Students’ Administrative Council (SAC)
  • Mask fit testing (Room 115)
  • Technology session – how to log into and use banner
  • Pictures for student cards
  • Purchase locks/locker rentals/pick up books
  • Regular scheduled postsecondary classes resume at noon

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